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PUBLICATIONS

Academic Papers

Ecological Economics

Structuring Legal Trade in Rhino Horn to Incentivize the Participation of South African Private Landowners

There is contentious debate in the literature regarding the conservation efficacy of the international rhinoceros
horn trade ban. Because the ban has been in effect for 40 years, it is unclear how potential legal horn trade should be structured to attain rhino conservation on private lands. We sought to fill this gap by eliciting the preferences of South African private wildlife industry members (who conserve a third of South Africa’s rhinoceroses) for international trade in rhino horn.

Endangered Species Research Crp

Applying a conceptual framework to rhinoceros conservation on private lands in South Africa

Although there is a large body of literature on rhinoceros (‘rhino’) conservation, a
comprehensive analysis of the challenges inherent in rhino conservation is missing. In particular,
the role of private landowners in rhino conservation has been insufficiently addressed, even
though private landowners manage a third of the rhino population in South Africa. In this paper
we apply a conceptual framework to the issue of rhino conservation on private lands in South
Africa.

Human Dimensions of Wildlife

Understanding South African private landowner decisions to manage rhinoceroses

With increased poaching pressures, rhinoceroses have become a financial liability due to expensive anti-poaching security costs required to protect this species. Nonetheless, approximately one-third of South Africa’s rhinoceros population is protected on private lands. In a time when the future existence of rhinoceroses is uncertain, it is important to determine (a) the considerations included in private sector decisions to participate in rhinoceros conservation and (b) how increased conservation of rhinoceroses on private lands may be attained.

Cambridge Core

Rhinoceros ownership and attitudes towards legalization of global horn trade within South Africa’s private wildlife sector

South Africa’s private sector is vital to rhino conservation yet there is a lack of research into the attitudes of current and potential rhino owners towards rhino conservation and horn trade. We surveyed members of the South African private wildlife ranching industry to examine these matters. We sought to understand: (1) ranchers’ motivations for owning or not owning rhinos, (2) how rhino ownership affects ranchers’ income and operations, and (3) the attitudes of wildlife industry members towards legalization of global rhino horn trade.

ARTICLES

WILDLIFE POLICY IN SOUTHERN
AFRICA: Why not crop the game?

Dr Brian Child

AN OVERVIEW OF THE PAPERS 

 

Dr JL Anderson

HIGH-COURT CHALLENGE:
TRADE MORATORIUM ON RHINO HORN

Izak du Toit

CONSERVATION &
COMMUNITY BENEFITS

Julian Sturgeon

THE COST OF THE CITES TRADE BAN ON AFRICAN RHINO CONSERVATION

Pelham Jones

AN ASSESSMENT OF
THE ANTI-TRADE ARGUMENTS

Jane Wiltshire

STOP THE KILLING

JC Strauss

THE SWAZI
CONSERVATION REALITY 

Ted Reilly

BOOK REVIEWS

Book Review

RHINO REVOLUTION – Searching for New Solutions

Chris & Anton Walker

Clive and Anton Walker point out that South Africa finds itself in a situation where the enemy is in its own back yard. Even with the finest fighting force on the ground, there seems to be no political will to get to grips with the problem, the authors believe. But there is hope thanks to the dedicated citizenry and individuals who are fighting the good fight to save the rhino.

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